Tagged: corona virus

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What Makes Coronavirus So Infectious?

Over 100,000 coronavirus infections worldwide. Scientists around the world are feverishly wondering why the virus is spreading so easily.

In an article published in the journal Nature, the reason lies in the protein in the surface of the virus, which makes it able to affect human cells. Scientists are also looking for a “gateway” if the coronavirus penetrates human tissue. The suspicion is directed to a receptor that exists in the cell membrane.

According to the researchers, the exact drug that targets the viral protein and the cell membrane receptor could potentially prevent the virus from spreading. There is no absolute certainty.

“Understanding the infectivity of the virus is the key to limiting its spread and limping,” says virologist David Veesler of the University of Washington.

Coronavirus with the highest possible spread than SARS. By now, there must have been more than ten times the number of people who have sailed to SARS.

Coronaviruses use cells to infect spike protein that binds to the cell membrane. The process is activated by a specific cellular enzyme. COVID-19 coronavirus peak protein follows from other coronaviruses. It looks like it should be activated by the host cell proprotein converting enzyme furin. Other coronaviruses do not have this feature.

Furin is found in many human tissues, such as the lungs, liver and small intestine. That’s why a new type of coronavirus could attack multiple organs, says Chinese researcher Li Hua in an article.

Other groups of researchers are more cautious about the meaningful relationships of furin.┬áIt is certain that researchers’ hypotheses require that they be validated in cell and animal models.

“Coronaviruses are unpredictable, and a good hypothesis will prove to be the amount used,” says virologist Gary Whittaker of Cornell University.

According to the findings of a Texas research team, COVID-19 coronavirus binds to the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in cells. It may also be possible for the vaccine or drug target.